III. POWERS OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL COURT


Article 21

 
(1) The Constitutional Court decides:
- on the conformity of laws with the Constitution;
- on the conformity of laws and other regulations with ratified treaties and with the general principles of international law;
- on the conformity of regulations with the Constitution and with laws;
- on the conformity of local community regulations with the Constitution and with laws;
- on the conformity of general acts issued for the exercise of public authority with the Constitution, laws, and regulations;
- on constitutional complaints stemming from the violation of human rights and fundamental freedoms by individual acts;
- on jurisdictional disputes between the state and local communities, and among local communities themselves;
- on jurisdictional disputes between courts and other state authorities;
- on jurisdictional disputes between the National Assembly, the President of the Republic, and the Government;
- on the accountability of the President of the Republic referred to in Article 109 of the Constitution, and of the President of the Government and ministers referred to in Article 119 of the Constitution;
- on the unconstitutionality of the acts and activities of political parties;
- on appeals in the procedure for confirming the election of deputies;
- on other matters vested in the Constitutional Court by laws.

(2) In the process of ratifying a treaty, the Constitutional Court issues an opinion on the conformity of such treaty with the Constitution in the manner provided by this Act.

(3) When deciding on the matters referred to in indents one to five of the first paragraph of this article, the Constitutional Court also decides on the constitutionality and legality of the procedures by which these acts were adopted.

Article 21a
  
(1) Applications addressed to the Constitutional Court for which the Constitutional Court does not have jurisdiction in accordance with the provisions of the preceding article, are resolved by the Secretary General of the Constitutional Court.

(2) In the instances referred to in the preceding paragraph, the Secretary General explains to the applicant why the application is not among the types of cases which the Constitutional Court has jurisdiction to decide and states the conditions under which it is possible in accordance with the law to initiate proceedings before the Constitutional Court.

(3) The Secretary General of the Constitutional Court responds with explanations also to complaints and objections against Constitutional Court decisions and to applications regarding which the Constitutional Court so decides.